vice president – Ocupario http://ocupario.org/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 00:58:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ocupario.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-3-150x150.png vice president – Ocupario http://ocupario.org/ 32 32 NFL posts VP of sports betting job after Calvin Ridley suspension https://ocupario.org/nfl-posts-vp-of-sports-betting-job-after-calvin-ridley-suspension/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 00:58:38 +0000 https://ocupario.org/nfl-posts-vp-of-sports-betting-job-after-calvin-ridley-suspension/ Posted: March 12, 2022, 4:56 a.m. Last update: March 12, 2022, 05:09 a.m. Steve Bittenbender Read more The timing may seem a little odd to some, but the National Football League posted a job posting on Friday morning: Vice President, General Manager – Sports Betting. Atlanta Falcons wide receiver Calvin Ridley makes a catch during […]]]>

Posted: March 12, 2022, 4:56 a.m.

Last update: March 12, 2022, 05:09 a.m.

The timing may seem a little odd to some, but the National Football League posted a job posting on Friday morning: Vice President, General Manager – Sports Betting.

Calvin Riley
Atlanta Falcons wide receiver Calvin Ridley makes a catch during a 2021 NFL regular season game against the Washington Football Team. On Friday, the NFL announced it was looking for a vice president for sports betting just days after it suspended Ridley for betting on championship games last season. (Image: Brett Davis/USA Today Sports)

As Bill King of Sports Business Journal noted, the league actually created the position two years ago before implementing a hiring freeze due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The NFL job description said the person chosen for the role would serve as a “key leader” for its Legalized Sports Betting (LSB) initiatives and work with others across the league.

This role will be responsible for continued growth and strategy, promoting LSB initiatives and partnerships across the League and its 32 member clubs, ensuring accurate and timely communication to senior management and ownership,” indicates the job description. “The ideal candidate works collaboratively, builds consensus while anticipating future dependencies, possesses strong interpersonal leadership qualities, and possesses a deep understanding of sports betting and the broader sports business landscape.”

There is no timeline for when the league can fill the executive role.

Maintaining league integrity a priority

The job description lists four objectives for the role. The first is “Continue to protect the integrity of the game”.

The integrity of the league was put in the spotlight last week when the league suspended Calvin Ridley for at least a year. The decision came after officials learned the Atlanta Falcons’ star receiver had placed a series of parlay bets that included bets on his team’s win.

According to reports, Ridley placed bets in late November using the Hard Rock Sportsbook app. He was not an active member of the Falcons at the time, as the team placed him on the non-football illness list earlier in the season. The former 1,000-yard receiver cited mental health issues as a reason for stepping away.

The NFL investigation later determined that Ridley had no insider information and no games had been compromised. However, the league considered it essential to issue a severe sanction against a high-level player.

“There is nothing more fundamental to the success of the NFL – and to the reputation of everyone associated with our league – than maintaining the integrity of the game,” commissioner Roger Goodell wrote in a letter. to Ridley informing him of the league action. “It is the responsibility of every player, coach, owner, match official and anyone else employed in the league. Your actions endanger the integrity of the game, threaten to damage public confidence in professional football and potentially undermined the reputation of your fellow players throughout the NFL.

The NFL is also looking to increase fan value and engagement

The NFL’s other legal betting goals include enhancing the league’s reputation and brand, increasing fan engagement worldwide, and leveraging the data and intellectual property of the league. the league.

Like other professional sports leagues, the NFL quickly moved from opposing legalized sports betting to embracing it. Part of that was having a say or possible control over how sports betting worked in new markets. A bigger reason was to make sure this and the teams get a share of the profits from the game. This is being done through efforts to require official data to classify bets and allow teams to partner with operators legal.

For example, Caesars Sportsbook and the Indianapolis Colts have used their partnership to help the team increase season ticket sales.

In some states, NFL teams have or will have access to betting licenses which they can then assign to operators. Construction began two months ago on a BetMGM sports betting site at State Farm Stadium in Phoenix, where the Arizona Cardinals play. Sports betting law recently enacted in Ohio will allow the Cincinnati Bengals and Cleveland Browns to join in sports betting.

The expanded Illinois Gaming Act that legalized sports betting in the state will also allow major professional teams to partner with operators as well. This means that if the Chicago Bears end up building a new stadium in Arlington Park, it could very well come with a sportsbook.

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‘Fairness’ sparks dispute over Montana teacher code of ethics https://ocupario.org/fairness-sparks-dispute-over-montana-teacher-code-of-ethics/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 22:22:16 +0000 https://ocupario.org/fairness-sparks-dispute-over-montana-teacher-code-of-ethics/ A public meeting to review and approve changes to Montana’s code of ethics for teachers became a flashpoint for debate about diversity and racially-based education in public schools on Wednesday. At a state Certification Standards and Practices Advisory Council (CSPAC) hearing, members gathered public comment on a proposal to remove a line in Montana’s code […]]]>

A public meeting to review and approve changes to Montana’s code of ethics for teachers became a flashpoint for debate about diversity and racially-based education in public schools on Wednesday.

At a state Certification Standards and Practices Advisory Council (CSPAC) hearing, members gathered public comment on a proposal to remove a line in Montana’s code of ethics for professional educators stating that an ethical educator “understands and respects diversity” and replaces it with “demonstrates an understanding of equity and inclusion in education and respects human diversity”. The word “fairness” quickly drew criticism from more than a dozen members of the public, Governor Greg Gianforte and Superintendent of Public Instruction Elsie Arntzen, both Republicans.

Opponents of the change, which CSPAC eventually approved in a unanimous vote, claimed the word “equity” would erode education standards by urging teachers to seek equal outcomes for all students. Several speakers also invoked one of the most controversial contemporary topics in education, suggesting without elaboration that change could lead to teaching critical race theory in Montana schools.

Among those testifying in opposition was Dennison Rivera, director of communications for Arntzen, who said he was speaking not in his official role with the Office of Public Instruction, but as a citizen and president Young Republicans from Montana. Rivera, who was raised by Honduran and Colombian parents, said he was tired of people “seeing me as marginalized or oppressed” and suggested that some white Montanese are “trying to make everything politically correct” because they are “ashamed of being white”.

“Let’s be honest, this principle here is a component of critical race theory that is banned in Montana and violates federal and state law because it’s discriminatory,” Rivera said of the proposed equity language. “Diversity creates inequality when you favor people based on their race, gender or religion over others. Also, equity eliminates diversity when you eliminate any socialization differences, such as boys and girls. It makes no sense to include conflicting standards in your code of ethics.

CSPAC President Kerry Elder noted several times during the meeting that the words “equity” and “inclusion” have specific historical definitions in educational contexts. The first, he said, arose in the early 2000s out of an effort to increase student performance and close longstanding achievement gaps. The latter, he continued, has been around for even longer and is directly concerned with providing specific accommodations for individual students. Montana Federation of Public Employees President Amanda Curtis, whose organization represents teachers and staff in public schools, echoed that stance, reciting an email sent to her by a pro-pro-government educator. change.

“Fairness is the quality of being fair and impartial,” Curtis read. “Good teachers must consistently demonstrate fairness and fairness with their colleagues, students, and other stakeholders, rather than ascribing some sort of implicit, divisive meaning to the word fairness.”

Gianforte took the opposite view on Tuesday. In a letter to CSPAC, he defined “fairness” based on a statement made by Vice President Kamala Harris in November 2020, quoting her as saying, “Fair treatment means we all end up on the same place.” Gianforte wrote that adding this principle to teachers’ codes of ethics could have “disastrous consequences for our students,” saying recent reviews of student performance standards in other states were made “in the name of equity”.

“I do not wish to see Montana public schools fall into the traps of promoting a political agenda, in the name of equity, that undermines opportunities for our students,” Gianforte wrote. “It would do a disservice to the students who should and must come first.”

Gianforte’s testimony also highlighted disagreement over another definition: the role of CSPAC itself. The governor’s letter, read aloud Wednesday by his education policy adviser, Dylan Klapmeier, claimed that changing the ethics code is a “political decision” that falls within the purview of the Montana Board of Public Education. This position was shared by Arntzen both during her testimony in person and in a letter she sent to the board on Wednesday.

“CSPAC’s purpose is for advisory purposes only and is not a decision-making authority,” Arntzen wrote. “I believe we need to make it clear that the authority of this board is to report to the Board of Public Education.”

As noted on its website, CSPAC is an advisory board of seven Montana educators, appointed by the school board, who conduct research and provide policy recommendations to the board. And Council on Public Education Executive Director McCall Flynn confirmed to the Montana Free Press on Wednesday that authority over the code of ethics rests with CSPAC, not the council. It’s an ambitious document, Flynn said, outlining the qualities CSPAC considers fundamental to an ethical educator. It is not state policy and has no enforcement weight.

“That’s how you should behave when you’re working with students, when you’re in the community,” Flynn said. “You will see that there are all sorts of different criteria that explain how one should act as an educator.”

CSPAC Chairman Elder told Klapmeier on Wednesday, rebutting Gianforte’s assessment of the council’s authority and asking Klapmeier to inform the governor that CSPAC is an advisory council that does not deal with political issues. and that the code of ethics is “purely ambitious”.

“It’s a goal,” Elder said. “It’s a vision of what…a professional educator will look like in the classroom.”

Following the board’s approval of equity language and other changes, Gianforte doubled down, repeating in a statement that CSPAC “does not have the legal authority to set policy.” He called on the Board of Public Education to “right this politically motivated wrong”.

“This morning’s CSPAC decision puts an extreme political agenda before students in Montana,” Gianforte said. “As we have seen across the country, the promotion of educational equity, or the idea that all students end up in the same place with equal results, undermines students’ educational opportunities. Instead, schools in Montana should promote equality in education, the idea that every student should have equal opportunity to learn, grow, and reach their full potential. CSPAC’s decision undermines equal opportunity for students.

For more than two decades, the Office of Public Instruction has distributed the Professional Educators’ Code of Ethics alongside the licenses it issues to educators in Montana. Arntzen said during his testimony Wednesday that the board does not have the power to compel him to continue this practice. Rob Watson, CSPAC member and superintendent of Missoula County Public Schools, said he understands Arntzen has no obligation to share the code.

“If she decides or if the Office of Public Instruction decides not to include this document, I would be disappointed,” Watson said. “But I will continue to pass this document along to the 800 teachers who work for Missoula County Public Schools.”

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Brian Flores is driven by moral rectitude, say friends https://ocupario.org/brian-flores-is-driven-by-moral-rectitude-say-friends/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 18:44:15 +0000 https://ocupario.org/brian-flores-is-driven-by-moral-rectitude-say-friends/ During his first preseason as head coach of the Miami Dolphins, in 2019, Brian Flores spoke movingly about the social injustice he faced as a young black and Latino man in the distressed section. from Brownsville to Brooklyn. Referring to athletes like then-Dolphins wide receiver Kenny Stills and ostracized quarterback Colin Kaepernick, Flores said he […]]]>

During his first preseason as head coach of the Miami Dolphins, in 2019, Brian Flores spoke movingly about the social injustice he faced as a young black and Latino man in the distressed section. from Brownsville to Brooklyn.

Referring to athletes like then-Dolphins wide receiver Kenny Stills and ostracized quarterback Colin Kaepernick, Flores said he applauds those who protest racial inequality and police brutality.

“They draw attention to my story,” Flores, the son of Honduran immigrants, told reporters. “I am the son of immigrants. I’m black. I grew up poor. I grew up in New York during the stop-and-frisk era. I was arrested because I matched a description before. So whatever these guys are protesting, I’ve been through it, I’ve been through it.

Fired last month by the Dolphins, although he posted a winning record in two of his three seasons as head coach, and then went through what he described as an interview “fictitious” with the Giants, Flores now sees himself as having been arrested – or at least turned away – yet again because he fit a certain description.

On Tuesday, Flores, who turns 41 this month, filed a class action lawsuit, accusing the NFL of systemic racism by discriminating against him and other black coaches in its hiring practices. In a 32-team league in which about 70% of players are black, only one current head coach — Mike Tomlin of the Pittsburgh Steelers — is black.

Nine teams had head coaching openings during this year’s hiring cycle, and of the six teams that have already hired or are said to have decided to pick one, the job went to a white male.

Harry Edwards, the eminent sociologist and social activist who is a longtime consultant to the San Francisco 49ers, said: “We are about to have more African Americans on the Supreme Court of the United States than like NFL head coaches. It’s outrageous.”

Flores’ lawyers did not make him available for an interview. He has said in several television appearances that real change will not come from political fiat, but only by changing “the hearts and minds” of key NFL team owners. Only two aren’t white — Shahid Khan of the Jacksonville Jaguars, a Pakistani American, and Kim Pegula of Buffalo, a Korean American who owns the Bills with her husband, Terry.

Some who have known Flores for many years, including Dino Mangiero, his high school coach at Poly Prep Country Day School in Brooklyn, say he has long had a strong sense of moral purpose. Mangiero described Flores as “serious as a heart attack” and “a principled man who if he feels something is wrong, he won’t tolerate it”.

“I think all he’s looking for is a sincere shot,” said Mangiero, 63, who played six seasons in the NFL and recently signed to coach Archbishop McCarthy High School in Southwest Ranches, Fla. . “I’m very proud of him. He stands up for what he believes in. It takes a lot of courage. His career is at stake, there’s no doubt about it.

As Flores contemplates an uncertain future, the friends he has kept since his days at Poly Prep have rallied behind him. Clifton Coker, who like Flores attended private school through a scholarship program for promising student-athletes, said Flores relied on mentors and tried to do things the right way to achieve his goals. career goals. “For something to feel wrong, and in the direction that it’s been taught to believe, it’s disheartening,” Coker said.

After graduating from Boston College, where a leg injury ended any hope of playing in the NFL as a safety or linebacker, Flores joined the staff of the New England Patriots in 2004. He started as an assistant scouting, transporting players to and from the airport. , picking up dry cleaning, sleeping on an air mattress in a friend’s attic.

But even then, Scott Pioli, New England’s vice-president of player personnel at the time, saw the caring nature of Flores. Before the Super Bowl in 2019, Pioli, who had moved from New England by then, said he used to jokingly call Flores “the union boss” and “Jimmy Hoffa.” If one of the scout assistants had a problem or a question, Flores spoke about it with Pioli.

Nate Solder, who won two Super Bowls in New England as an offensive tackle and most recently played for the Giants, recalled Flores’ sense of fairness in an interview. Once, Solder said, Flores upset the veteran Patriots forward line in practice by putting his foot on the ball and disrupting the rushing offense so he could set up the defense. scout team.

“I’ll spare the tongue, but it was intense,” Solder said. “It was like, ‘I’m going to fight you for this. I don’t care. I’m going to do this right.'”

During a training camp workout in 2019, Flores played eight consecutive Brooklyn-born Jay-Z songs after Stills criticized the rapper as deaf when he entered into an entertainment and social justice partnership with the NFL Jay-Z said the league had “gone past kneeling” for the anthem, which angered Stills, who took a knee to protest racial inequality.

Flores received some criticism, including from the Miami Herald’s editorial page, which likened her choice of music to “a smiley taunt, giving the backhand to a real American scourge” of police brutality.

Flores did not apologize, saying he challenged Stills not to let the outside world affect his performance. Her own sense of righteousness, Flores said in 2019, shortly before her mother, Maria, who died of breast cancer, was instilled by her unwavering values. Maria Flores raised five sons while the family patriarch, Raul Sr., was away for months as a merchant marine.

Education was paramount. Four of the Flores siblings, including Brian, earned master’s degrees. His mother, he said, never seemed to flinch, even when she and her children had to climb 20 flights of stairs, sometimes carrying groceries, when the elevators broke at the Glenmore housing complex Plaza in Brownsville.

“She had a tremendously positive impact on me about how to treat people and lead with honor and integrity and do things the right way, always,” Flores said.

He spent 15 seasons with the Patriots, became the defensive caller and was part of four Super Bowl championship teams. Then, at age 37, he was hired by the Dolphins, becoming one of three black head coaches at the time. Since the so-called Rooney Rule was enacted in 2003 to spur more inclusive hiring, 27 of the 127 head coaching positions available in the NFL, or about 21%, have been filled by people of color, according to the ‘Associated Press.

At 40, Flores was fired. Stephen Ross, owner of the team, said: “An organization can only work if it is collaborative and works well together. Flores reportedly had a strained relationship with Dolphins general manager Chris Grier and starting quarterback Tua Tagovailoa. Not all players liked his intense training style.

In television interviews since his dismissal, Flores has spoken with a sense of betrayal, using words like humiliation, disbelief, hurt, anger. The classic immigrant assurance his mother gave him – work hard and the opportunity will come – has, he says, been distorted.

Ross pressured him to book the 2019 season for a top first-round pick, offering him $100,000 for each loss, a proposal he declined, Flores said in his lawsuit. And he cited text messages he said were sent by his former boss, New England coach Bill Belichick, on January 24. In the messages, Belichick appeared to congratulate Flores on being hired to coach the Giants, a job he has yet to get. January 27 interview for. The messages appeared to indicate Belichick intended the correspondence for another Brian — Brian Daboll, who is white and was hired by the Giants.

Ross called Flores’ allegations “false, malicious and defamatory.” The Giants said Thursday they had “concrete and objective evidence” that their coaching decision was not made until the day after Flores was interviewed, and that his claims are “disturbing and simply untrue.” But some other former black NFL coaches, Hue Jackson and Marvin Lewis, spoke of the familiarity of Flores’ desperation. And Solder, who is white, was among the players who tweeted in support of Flores.

“I have no doubt what he’s describing is totally accurate,” Solder said in an interview.

Legal experts say Flores’ case will be tough to win unless he can prove race was a factor in his job refusal.

Edwards, the sociologist, said it seems likely Flores will encounter the same resistance faced by Curt Flood, the St. Louis Cardinals center back who lost his legal challenge in the 1970s to overturn the reserve clause of the Major League Baseball, which tied players to a team. for their entire career. Free agency finally came, but at a high professional and personal cost to Flood.

And now Flores is in danger of no longer coaching.

“We are so mired in racism and traditions of exclusion and martyring those who oppose it, that we say this is the expected price to stand up,” Edwards said.

Richard Lapchick, director of the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport at the University of Central Florida, described Flores as “the coaching equivalent of Kaepernick,” saying he couldn’t see Flores being offered another coaching job in the short term, maybe never. .

But, Lapchick added in a more optimistic tone, the athlete activism that intensified during the racial reckoning following the May 2020 killing of George Floyd could turn its attention to the hiring practices of varsity teams and professionals.

“Not that they would require hiring a black coach,” Lapchick said, “but that they open up the process to make sure there’s a fair process, which usually ends up with more diverse applicants and more diverse choices.

Sheelagh McNeill contributed to the research.

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From county commissioner to students, community weighs in on selection of new SUU president – St George News https://ocupario.org/from-county-commissioner-to-students-community-weighs-in-on-selection-of-new-suu-president-st-george-news/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 18:15:08 +0000 https://ocupario.org/from-county-commissioner-to-students-community-weighs-in-on-selection-of-new-suu-president-st-george-news/ Rich Christiansen, co-chair of the SUU Presidential Search Committee, speaks alongside his co-chair Nina Barnes during Tuesday meetings for public comment, Cedar City, Utah, January 18, 2022 | Photo courtesy of Southern Utah University, St. George News/Cedar City News CEDAR CITY — When members of the newly formed presidential search committee for Southern Utah University […]]]>

Rich Christiansen, co-chair of the SUU Presidential Search Committee, speaks alongside his co-chair Nina Barnes during Tuesday meetings for public comment, Cedar City, Utah, January 18, 2022 | Photo courtesy of Southern Utah University, St. George News/Cedar City News

CEDAR CITYWhen members of the newly formed presidential search committee for Southern Utah University met Tuesday to listen to the campus community, they encountered almost as many questions as suggestions.

Research Committee Members Gather Input from Community Members, Students, Faculty, and Staff Representing Various Interests at Southern Utah University, Cedar City, Utah, January 18, 2022 | Photo courtesy of Southern Utah University, St. George News/Cedar City News

How will the new president interact with students? What will they do to connect the university to its surrounding community? Who will the president represent? How will they view mental health and promote wellness on campus?

These questions and many more have been asked repeatedly and in different ways by students, university employees and members of the community. Fortunately for the search committee, many of the same people who asked the questions also offered examples of positive leadership and proposals for addressing these challenges – as well as encouraging words for committee members.

“A lot of times there’s a disconnect between the student experience and the top brass, so to speak,” said Sam Crittenden, chief of staff for the student union. “Finding people to proactively bridge that gap and be part of the student experience and personally invest their time in student lives makes a huge difference to the value of the student experience here at SUU and certainly has for me. “

Other comments from students, faculty, and staff were aimed at making all students feel welcome and promoting well-being.

“In this new president, I would like them to have a great understanding and a great ability to recognize that diversity, equity and inclusion is a key part of our culture,” said Jayson Matlock, deputy director of financial aid. “We are growing not only in the types of programs and initiatives we offer, but also in our mindset, our vision and our culture.

An undated file photo of SUU students, Cedar City, Utah | Photo courtesy of Southern Utah University, St. George News/Cedar City News

Public meetings were held in two-hour increments beginning at 10 a.m. Tuesday morning. Each meeting had a peak audience of over 90 attendees joining remotely via Zoom and over 20 additional members of the public attending at the Sharwan Smith Student Center.

For community members and alumni in attendance, the primary concern seemed to be the President’s investment in the local community and their desire to make inroads with local leaders and other community institutions.

Iron County Commissioner Michael Bleak spoke at the afternoon meeting and expressed his desire that the search focus on alumni and other qualified individuals who have a commitment to SUU and a understanding of local culture.

“I think it’s really important for the president to be aware of and relate to those cultures, as well as local Native American culture, pioneer heritage and that kind of stuff,” Bleak said. “Too often in SUU’s past, the decision for positions has not necessarily been based on the best fit for the school or the community.”

Bleak, who is also currently enrolled as a student at SUU, spoke about the challenges the city and county face in meeting student housing and safety needs.

Eight of the 21 members of the Presidential Search Committee attended the morning meeting, Cedar City, Utah, January 18, 2022 | Photo courtesy of Southern Utah University, St. George News/Cedar City News

Based on feedback from several faculty members and community representatives, the new president will need to balance the growth of the institution with maintaining quality education and a high standard of living.

In terms of innovation, several speakers praised past presidents’ efforts to advance the university’s teaching and expand academic offerings. Some, like President Brennan Wood of Southwest Technical College, said they hope SUU will continue dual enrollment and online education that provides quality education at a reduced cost to many rural and low-income students.

The presidential search was precipitated by the announcement in June 2021 that then-President Scott Wyatt had accepted a new position as Senior Executive Director of Statewide Online Education in the Office of the Commissioner of Higher Education.

Shortly after Wyatt’s departure, Utah’s higher education system selected Mindy Benson to serve as interim president until the formal selection process for a new college president could be completed. be finished. At the time, Benson was vice president of alumni and community relations at SUU.

“If you look at President Wyatt and Acting President Benson, they’ve both been heavily involved on campus,” said Hunter Bosgieter, a current student and student programming council member. “They felt ‘down to earth’. They are always saying hello to the students and they really get to know us. If this continues, I feel like it will help the school grow a lot as well as the community.

Scott Wyatt, SUU President 2013-June 2021, delivers welcome address to students for the Fall 2018 semester, Cedar City, Utah, August 20, 2018 | Photo courtesy of Southern Utah University, St. George News/Cedar City News

The search committee is made up of 21 members and led by co-chairs Rich Christiansen of the SUU Board of Trustees and Nina R. Barnes of the Utah Council on Higher Education. In addition to these two interests, the committee includes representatives from the community, students, and SUU faculty and staff.

“The next step for this committee will be to prepare a position announcement,” Barnes said. “We’ll take all those comments and our own, and put them into a document – it’s kind of a job description. Any comments you make to the committee are heard, and anything you send will be incorporated into this position announcement.

Once the announcement is finalized, the committee will launch a call for applications. Utah’s higher education system has engaged executive search firm WittKieffer to expand the candidate pool and assist in the vetting process.

“We’re honestly very careful at this point not to come to preformed conclusions,” Christiansen said. “We encouraged the whole committee, although everyone has their opinion, to be really open and to be very careful before establishing the selection criteria. I think student-centered attention and a lot of the things mentioned are on all of our minds, but we’re really deliberate about not just pushing a program.

Along with the job advertisement, the search committee will use the current strategic plan and suggestions received during the screening of applications and interviewing candidates. After narrowing the pool of candidates to three to five candidates, the state board of higher education will select the new president.

All stakeholders are invited to submit their comments, questions and suggestions to the research committee by e-mail at [email protected], or use the committee website to learn more about the process. According to a press release, the Utah Board of Higher Education intends to appoint a new president by fall 2022.

Copyright St.George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2022, all rights reserved.

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Building an Ethical Newsroom – Poynter https://ocupario.org/building-an-ethical-newsroom-poynter/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 18:41:11 +0000 https://ocupario.org/building-an-ethical-newsroom-poynter/ As culture changes and ethical values ​​evolve, how are you and your newsroom responding? Do you have practices and policies that respond to the moment? In this new online course from the Craig Newmark Center for Ethics and Leadership at Poynter, you’ll learn how to strengthen your newsroom’s ethical infrastructure and tackle tough challenges where […]]]>

As culture changes and ethical values ​​evolve, how are you and your newsroom responding? Do you have practices and policies that respond to the moment?

In this new online course from the Craig Newmark Center for Ethics and Leadership at Poynter, you’ll learn how to strengthen your newsroom’s ethical infrastructure and tackle tough challenges where two or more values ​​collide.

Poynter’s Senior Vice President and Chief Ethics Officer, Kelly McBride, will be your guide. Drawing on her decades of experience as an ethics coach and public writer, she will reveal the methods she uses to assess a newsroom’s ethical strengths and weaknesses. You will explore the dozens of factors – both concrete policies and general qualities – that contribute to a healthy environment for making ethical decisions. With McBride’s stewardship, you will diagnose your own individual capacity and, if possible, the capacity of your press organization.

Each session will include a case study that reviews a newsroom pressure point, including journalists’ personal activism, conflicts created by donors and sponsors, social media debacles, balancing the needs of vulnerable sources and the requirements of staff diversity.

After the three-week, six-session course, you will have modern ethics policy models, communication skills to resolve ethical conflicts as they arise, and leadership strategies to facilitate a culture of ethics in your newsroom.

Questions?

If you need help, email us at info@poynter.org.

Who should register

This course is designed for those who can set or influence ethics policy within their news organizations.

Leaders and managers responsible for ethics policies and decision-making, standards editors, executives and those dealing with conflicts of interest between business and journalism (especially in non-profit organizations profit) will benefit. Academic educators, journalists interested in ethics or writing about ethics are also welcome.

Cost

Tuition for this live online group seminar, which includes nine hours of live instruction, is $450.

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Jan. 6 panel wrestles with how to get testimony from lawmakers, Pence https://ocupario.org/jan-6-panel-wrestles-with-how-to-get-testimony-from-lawmakers-pence/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 01:42:27 +0000 https://ocupario.org/jan-6-panel-wrestles-with-how-to-get-testimony-from-lawmakers-pence/ Vice Speaker Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., speaks with Speaker Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., and Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., as the House Select Committee investigating the insurrection of January 6 meets on December 13. Washington Post photo of Jabin Botsford The House panel investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection is in the midst of a crucial debate over how […]]]>

The House panel investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection is in the midst of a crucial debate over how aggressively to seek cooperation from key witnesses who resist testifying before the committee, including several members of Congress and the former Vice President Mike Pence.

Pence, along with Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and Reps. Scott Perry, R-Pa., and Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, could help the committee paint a full picture of President Donald’s role Trump on the Capitol insurrection and the extent of his influence on efforts to disrupt the official certification of Joe Biden’s victory.

But the four lawmakers refused to cooperate, leading the Jan. 6 committee to consider whether to issue subpoenas to sitting members of Congress, a step taken rarely in the past.

The panel is split on whether to pursue such subpoenas, in part over concerns that a protracted legal fight will delay the committee’s goal of releasing a report before the November midterms, according to people familiar with the matter. debate who spoke on condition of anonymity to reveal internal discussions.

Some committee members, including Vice Chair Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., reported aggressive posturing while others, including Chair Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., issued notes of skepticism about the possibility to enforce such assignments.

At the same time, the panel has entered into preliminary discussions with Pence about how to get his account of events, including the sustained pressure he has received from Trump and other Republicans to block certification of the election victory. of Biden.

There has been little public discussion about the possibility of calling Trump as a witness or traveling to secure his account of events, but “nothing has been ruled out,” a committee staffer said.

For Pence, the committee’s goal would be to get the former vice president to answer questions under oath, ideally in public. Options for obtaining his cooperation were discussed in preliminary conversations between the committee’s chief counsel, Tim Heaphy, and Pence’s attorney, Richard Cullen, who was just appointed adviser to Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin, R But Pence doesn’t want to appear in front of the committee, his insiders say. “I don’t see any situation where he does that,” a senior adviser said.

The two attorneys, who are friends and former legal partners, have informally discussed the possibility of Pence cooperating and how it might happen. Heaphy expressed the committee’s desire for Pence to answer questions in a taped interview, but the former vice president made it clear from the start that he neither wanted nor planned to testify, according to people familiar with the conversations. .

Some of Pence’s advisers believe the framework is under the vice president’s office, and Pence has come to believe that the committee has become overtly partisan. Answering questions under oath could also be politically damaging to Pence as he considers a potential 2024 presidential bid and seeks support from Trump voters.

For several weeks, Pence advisers said their opinion of the committee had deteriorated as the panel appeared to act in a more partisan manner, stressing the value of making criminal referrals and making comments they say were pressuring Pence.

Members spoke optimistically about Pence’s cooperation. Thompson said last week during an interview with NPR that members expected this month to ask Pence to appear voluntarily before the committee. He later backtracked on his comment, telling reporters on Monday that he never said an official request was coming.

“[Pence], like many other people, we think might have something to give the committee, but we haven’t made the decision to formally invite him to come here,” Thompson said.

Three weeks ago, former Pence chief of staff Marc Short publicly expressed his lack of confidence in the panel’s impartiality.

“I also can’t be very confident that this committee is going to provide some kind of unbiased analysis,” Short told Fox News, a sentiment shared by others in Pence’s orbit.

Nonetheless, Pence and his team continued to engage. Two of Pence’s top aides, including Short, are expected to appear before the committee in the coming weeks. Short’s attorney, Emmet Flood, was involved in negotiations with the committee over the line of questioning for him, according to people familiar with the discussion.

As for Pence, his attorney has suggested alternatives to questioning under oath, such as written answers to questions or an offer from the former vice president’s legal team.

The committee wants information on a wide range of topics, including the pressure put on Pence by Trump and his allies to block election certification on Jan. 6 and staff movements at the Justice Department, according to a person familiar with the demands of the committee. The panel is also interested in any conversations that may have taken place regarding pressure for Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment, declare Trump unfit for office and assume the powers and responsibilities of acting president, the person said.

The committee is also expected to interview Greg Jacob, Pence’s former attorney, next month. Last fall, the committee interviewed J. Michael Luttig, a former federal judge who advised Pence’s legal team in the days leading up to the Jan. 6 vote.

In a related move, Cheney reached out to longtime friend, former Vice President Dan Quayle, who spoke with Pence before Jan. 6, according to people familiar with the conversation. In their private chat, Quayle confirmed that he had informed Pence that he had “no choice” but to comply with the parliamentarian’s instructions and resist suggestions for election intervention. The conversation between Pence and Quayle was first recorded in the book “Peril”, by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa.

During an interview with The Washington Post on Friday, Quayle acknowledged speaking to Cheney but declined to discuss the substance of the conversation. Other than Cheney, Quayle said he had “no contact” with the select committee or its staff.

“I didn’t notice any hesitation on his part,” Quayle said of his conversation with Pence. “I interpreted his questions as seeking confirmation that what he was going to do was right and that he had no flexibility. That’s how I read it. Given the pressure he was under, I thought it was completely normal, very clever of him to call me.

The committee remains undecided on whether it will ultimately subpoena the House GOP lawmakers who rejected its pleas for voluntary cooperation. Although Thompson has previously said the committee would not hesitate to issue subpoenas, he has expressed reservations about their effective enforcement with GOP lawmakers.

“If we subpoena them and they choose not to come, I don’t know of any real vehicle that we can force them to comply with,” Thompson told ABC News last month.

Investigators have been working to identify precedents for subpoenas of serving members, according to two committee sources. One example they focused on is the House Ethics Committee‘s two-year investigation into the personal finances of Rep. Charles Rangel, DN.Y. Rangel, who was ultimately found guilty of 11 ethics charges, was subpoenaed by the investigating subcommittee after refusing repeated requests for a forensic accountant’s report and other documents.

Rob Walker, former chief counsel and staff director of the Senate and House ethics committees and former federal prosecutor, said that while he believes the committee has the power to subpoena members, there is a “colorful argument that when the Chamber undertakes the activity of reviewing the conduct of its own members, they should follow the process in place, which is the ethics process.

Although the committee has an investigative — not a disciplinary — mission, subpoenaed members might have a different perspective, Walker said.

“They could argue that the investigation could have negative consequences for them, whether politically or otherwise, and therefore it amounts to a quasi-disciplinary framework,” he said. “If that’s the case, they might have an argument that the House has procedures in place within the ethics committee to compel process and cooperation.”

Some lawmakers on the committee have taken a more aggressive stance. Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., told CNN that “nothing prevents the committee from taking” the step of subpoenaing lawmakers and dismissed the idea that sitting lawmakers are shielded from abuse. investigation by the Constitution, which states that “in respect of any Speech or Debate in either House,” Congressional legislators “shall not be questioned in any other place.”

It is feared, however, that any litigation could delay the work of the committee by several months. But Kim Wehle, a law professor at the University of Baltimore, said the Supreme Court could speed up the process if it grants expedited review, as it did in a recent case involving coronavirus vaccine warrants.

During an interview on MSNBC Thursday, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-California, reiterated that the committee is still evaluating next steps, but suggested “other options than the criminal contempt route.”

“We have some remedies, potentially, with McCarthy, with Perry, with Jordan, with other members of the House that we don’t have with a Steve Bannon, for example, or Mark Meadows,” Schiff said, referring to a former political adviser to Trump. and a former Trump chief of staff who were subpoenaed. “It’s because the House can control its own members, can discipline its own members.”

Alice Crites of The Washington Post contributed to this report.

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After the first 11 months, Harris’ vice presidency is a work in progress – The Ukiah Daily Journal https://ocupario.org/after-the-first-11-months-harris-vice-presidency-is-a-work-in-progress-the-ukiah-daily-journal/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 14:14:58 +0000 https://ocupario.org/after-the-first-11-months-harris-vice-presidency-is-a-work-in-progress-the-ukiah-daily-journal/ New year, new start for Kamala Harris? Last year should have been a year of triumph for the Vice President. She was a pioneer as the first black and Asian woman to occupy the office. His ascendancy has erased memories of his faltering 2020 presidential campaign, which ended even before the start of the election […]]]>


New year, new start for Kamala Harris?

Last year should have been a year of triumph for the Vice President. She was a pioneer as the first black and Asian woman to occupy the office. His ascendancy has erased memories of his faltering 2020 presidential campaign, which ended even before the start of the election year. She was the second in command of a man who had held the position before, who understood his frustrations and, just as important, understood his potential.

And the whole business turned out to be a bit of a failure.

She didn’t accomplish much, she didn’t restore her image, she didn’t carve out achievements on her own. But in fairness, one of the reasons she didn’t stand out was because she was in a position where the job description requires a political figure to step aside.

Its role, and the role of the vice-presidency more broadly, is a work in progress. As Joe Biden’s association with Barack Obama has shown, a relationship potentially as important as that between the only two people directly elected by the public is not established in the first year, but can develop over time. as their mandate advances.

Biden knows, for example, that Harris can’t be closer to the legislature than he has been; his Senate connections are slim, the result of having, literally, a ninth of the time in the bedroom he had before he moved to the Vice President’s mansion on Observatory Circle. But he was not a historical figure like she is.

And so far – ignored by most commentators – she has navigated the difficult waters of executive politics much better than some of her predecessors.

Gerald R. Ford, who briefly served under the leadership of a besieged Richard M. Nixon by Watergate, essentially dumped his vice president, former Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller of New York City, during his first year. Bill Clinton and Al Gore walked away in their second term, and Dick Cheney was less influential in the second term than he was in the first, in part in reaction to the idea that ‘he had fashioned an “imperial vice-presidency” after the 2001 terrorism attacks.

In contrast, Ronald Reagan grew in respect for George HW Bush over time, and Obama called Biden “the best vice president America has ever had,” which could have been a presidential lie but a full lie. tactfully delivered in the nostalgic hollow of their last eight days at the office.

Biden would surely deliver an equally tactful public assessment of his vice president, but privately he would likely be inclined to think that the final verdict on Harris has yet to be sealed.

“She’s got some missteps and we’re talking about personnel issues, but by all appearances she still has a lot of access to Biden and is involved in a lot of public advocacy,” said Joel Goldstein, a law school expert. of the University of Saint Louis as vice-president. . “There is no reason why she cannot have a successful vice-presidency. It depends on what she learns and how she helps the president solve his problems. “

The vice-presidency is, of course, a delicate position, and most of the 48 men who came before her were in the same grim situation, although Harris, because of her visible minority identity, was a particular target of enmity.

Lyndon Johnson became irritated at work – so less powerful, so less interesting, so less rewarding than being the Senate Majority Leader – and was perhaps clinically depressed during the period 1961-1963; his main collaborator must have been pushing him – to cajole a stubborn and embittered man – to give a civil rights speech in Gettysburg which may have been his best time as vice-president. Hubert H. Humphrey was a hot and efficient senator but a brooding and humiliated vice-president; Walter F. Mondale once told me that the position, which he believed his mentor should never have accepted, crushed Humphrey’s mind and hurt him psychologically forever.

The Activist Vice President is a modern concoction, created by Mondale under Jimmy Carter (1977-1981) and Gore under Clinton (1993-2001). Dan Quayle, who served under the old Bush, does not fit this model, and personal loyalty and political assistance have been the main assets Bush and Biden brought to the office, although the Obama understudy has pushed President over gay rights and pushed back mission to kill Osama bin Laden. (He prevailed over the first, was rejected over the second.)

Mondale, who had witnessed Humphrey’s desperation and studied how desperate Rockefeller had been as Ford’s vice president, only accepted Carter’s post after lengthy negotiations ensuring he would have access unlimited to the president and any information Carter received. He also won the promise of having a regular lunch on Monday when the two were in town.

“He wanted a substantive role and not a ceremonial role,” said Richard Moe, who was Mondale’s chief of staff and who wrote the 11-page note outlining Minnesota’s hopes for the office, in an interview. “It worked because Carter thought the vice-presidency as it was designed was a wasted asset.”

Indeed, Carter took it a step further by offering Mondale an office in the West Wing and telling his staff that they should consider a request for information from Mondale as a request on his part. Biden had a similar arrangement with Obama, although Karine Prémont, deputy director of the Center for United States Studies at the University of Quebec at Montreal, says Biden’s appointment, with his soothing temper and easygoing relationship with Capitol Hill, was a reaction to Cheney’s aggressive vice-presidency.

Biden almost certainly had politics in mind when he picked Harris; his selection was a signal of his commitment to diversity and, following the California senator’s aggressive debate against Biden for his views on buses, his instinct for forgiveness. But he also almost certainly had the Biden role model in mind for the vice-presidency.

His prescription for work: being supportive but not aggressive, confident but also docile, conscientious but not demanding.

So the truth may be, Biden has exactly the vice president he wants, the vice president he needs – and the vice president he was.

David M. Shribman is the former editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


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How to write a job description for a vice president of sales? https://ocupario.org/how-to-write-a-job-description-for-a-vice-president-of-sales/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 20:49:11 +0000 https://ocupario.org/how-to-write-a-job-description-for-a-vice-president-of-sales/ A proper job description saves time, effort and attracts qualified talent to your opening. It also strengthens brand awareness. Therefore, developing a workable job description is essential for your talent acquisition efforts. Use the following template to create a practical vice president of sales job description for your Linkedin job posting or other free job […]]]>



A proper job description saves time, effort and attracts qualified talent to your opening. It also strengthens brand awareness. Therefore, developing a workable job description is essential for your talent acquisition efforts.

Use the following template to create a practical vice president of sales job description for your Linkedin job posting or other free job posting website.

Job sheet

As a Vice President of Sales, you will be responsible for leading your organization’s sales team to meet and exceed strategic goals.

Reports to

Commercial Director, CEO

Main responsibilities of a vice president of sales

Reporting to the (Chief Commercial Officer), you will lead a team of (number) professionals to achieve the goals of customer acquisition and business growth.

You will be responsible for:

  • Drive sales goals and meet budget and business goals
  • Identify new sales opportunities and build relationships with customers
  • Build a high performing team by providing strong mentoring, coaching and advice
  • Ensure timely recognition and rewards for top students and implement performance management actions as needed
  • Ensure the proper use of the CRM database and performance monitoring tools
  • Build strong and collaborative relationships with other internal stakeholders
  • Monitoring of market trends and regular analysis of competitors

Key requirements

  • You have a degree in business administration or a related field.
  • You have prior experience and a strong track record of success in a sales leadership role.
  • You have been successful in creating, developing and leading high performing sales teams.
  • You have a solid background in consultative selling and possess the ability to prospect and manage high-level relationships.
  • You are a team player who enjoys helping others succeed.
  • You are a strategic thinker and problem solver with the ability to be practical.

Previous articleHow to write a job description for a sales manager?


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The NIJ produces 922 graduates as chairman of the Harps Council on Ethics https://ocupario.org/the-nij-produces-922-graduates-as-chairman-of-the-harps-council-on-ethics/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 05:30:56 +0000 https://ocupario.org/the-nij-produces-922-graduates-as-chairman-of-the-harps-council-on-ethics/ Nigerian Institute of Journalism (NIJ) Board Chairman Ogba, Lagos Chief Olusegun Osoba said the institute which has proven itself over the past five decades in producing competent staff and Quality in Journalism, Advertising and Public Relations, among others, is being developed to become an effective finishing school in training experts in mass communication. The former […]]]>


Nigerian Institute of Journalism (NIJ) Board Chairman Ogba, Lagos Chief Olusegun Osoba said the institute which has proven itself over the past five decades in producing competent staff and Quality in Journalism, Advertising and Public Relations, among others, is being developed to become an effective finishing school in training experts in mass communication.

The former governor of Ogun State, who was represented by the vice-president of the council, Mr. Ray Ekpu, revealed it during the sixth convocation of the institute, which also culminated in the activities noting its 50th anniversary, where a total of 922 students received the scrolls. for obtaining the National Diploma, Higher Diploma,

Graduate diploma and certificate. Osoba, however, noted that the NIJ is aiming for a higher plinth to operate and provide quality service, stating: “It is our ambition and our desire to grow this institution in the years to become an incomparably finishing school. mass efficient. Communication.

To reach this threshold, we will need the support of our partners and stakeholders. Their support has been invaluable. We thank them very much.

The Chairman of the Board added, “Today we are awarding diplomas and certificates to 922 graduate students, who have excelled and found worthy of learning and character. We have just acquired a license for our radio shows. Before long, our radio shows will dominate the airwaves of our immediate community. “

Thus, he urged graduate students to be aware of the difference between school and professional life, noting that “in the United States this ceremony is called the Beginning.

It means the end of formal schooling and the start of working life. The world of work is different from the environment in which you have lived and studied in recent years.

“If you work in the newsroom, you’ll find it’s different from the classroom. You may have been absent from class without being punished, but if you take time off work without permission, you cannot escape the punishment ”,

Osoba added. Meanwhile, the provost, Mr. Gbenga Adefaye, noted that the ceremony was to celebrate the realization of the dream of the NIJ – 50 golden years later. “We salute our founding fathers, who, through their sacrifices and commitment, supported the dream.

Noteworthy are the former Presidents of the Board of Governors, from Alhaji Lateef Jakande to Aremo Olusegun Osoba, who was the Chairman of the Board 32 years ago and is now back in the saddle as Chairman to help lead the institution’s ship to the promised land; the late Mallam Ismaila Isa Funtua, who carried out reformatting, licensing and accreditation of the institution for national and higher national diploma programs, among others, ”he said.

In addition, the provost said that the goal of the NIJ leadership is to make it the last bus stop for professionals in journalism, media and the communications industry.



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Hoboken City Council Passes Wage and Housing Division Ordinances https://ocupario.org/hoboken-city-council-passes-wage-and-housing-division-ordinances/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 23:33:48 +0000 https://ocupario.org/hoboken-city-council-passes-wage-and-housing-division-ordinances/ 1/2 Hoboken City Council passed ordinances to increase wages and establish the Housing Division. Photo by Mark Koosau. 2/2 City Councilor Vanessa Falco will lead the Housing Division early next year. Photo provided by the City of Hoboken. ?? ?? × 1/2 Hoboken City Council passed ordinances to increase wages and establish the Housing Division. […]]]>


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Hoboken City Council passed ordinances to increase wages and establish the Housing Division. Photo by Mark Koosau.

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City Councilor Vanessa Falco will lead the Housing Division early next year. Photo provided by the City of Hoboken.


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Hoboken City Council passed ordinances to increase wages and establish the Housing Division. Photo by Mark Koosau.

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City Councilor Vanessa Falco will lead the Housing Division early next year. Photo provided by the City of Hoboken.


The salary increases and the creation of the new housing division were part of a two-hour meeting of Hoboken City Council.

At the December 1 meeting, the council voted to increase the salaries of elected officials and the maximum salary ranges for other city officials, and also voted to create a new housing division within the city.

Adoption of salary increases for elected officials and administrators

The city council voted to pass an ordinance that would increase the salaries of elected officials and the salary scales of a few senior city government officials. The order was first presented at the November 15 meeting.

The salary increases are as follows:

  • Mayor: $ 116,950 to $ 130,000 (This will come into effect following the election of a new mayor) *
  • Municipal council members: $ 24,130 to $ 35,000
  • President of the municipal council: $ 26,541 to $ 40,000
  • Vice-Chairman of the Board: $ 37,500

The maximum increases in the salary scale are as follows:

  • Corporate director: $ 162,000 to $ 199,000
  • Directors of Community Development, Social Services, Public Safety, Transportation and Parking, Environmental Services and Finance: $ 137,500 to $ 170,000.
  • Chief Financial Officer: $ 132,441.75 to $ 142,441.75
  • Tax collector: $ 133,850.37 to $ 141,850.37
  • Controller: $ 122,038.92 to $ 132,038.92
  • Assistant Controller: $ 107,558 to $ 120,000
  • Payroll Supervisor: $ 79,590.60 to $ 87,590.60.

The board voted 5-3-1 to pass it, with board members Phil Cohen, Jim Doyle, Vanessa Falco, Emily Jabbour and Michael Russo voting yes. Vice-President Jen Giattino, Michael DeFusco and Tiffanie Fisher voted no, and Council President Ruben Ramos abstained.

Hoboken spokeswoman Marilyn Baer said after the first reading that the ordinance was drafted in such a way that the city would remain “competitive in attracting and retaining talented employees, because over the past few years, several high-caliber managers have left town jobs after receiving higher-paying jobs with similar titles elsewhere.

Baer did not respond to comments on why elected officials were getting pay increases.

The adoption comes just a month after election day, where Doyle and Jabbour were re-elected last month under Mayor Ravi Bhalla’s list. Michael Russo’s uncle, George DeStefano, is also the city’s chief financial officer.

During the meeting, Fisher, who had strongly opposed the ordinance, attempted to bring forward a motion to separate it into different parts for elected officials, trustees and other city officials, but was rejected by council.

She also asked earlier who the sponsors of the ordinance were, noting that the law did not list them since they suspended in-person meetings. But that was shut down considerably, with board members saying they would put together a list of sponsors for the next meeting.

“It’s funny that people resist putting sponsors there,” she muttered at the meeting.

The day after the meeting, Fisher said he was disappointed that they had not been able to discuss and review each of them separately to “improve each of the terms for the different groups.”

“I just hope the administration prioritizes settling the five outstanding union contracts as soon as possible,” she said. “So the roughly 500 city workers who left without any increase in the cost of living for four years can get what they are entitled to. “

Officially established housing division

City council voted to formally create the Housing Division, which was announced by the city earlier this summer, and will aim to provide resources to meet affordable housing needs.

The division will be headed by City Councilor Vanessa Falco, who has been chosen by Bhalla for this and is stepping down from her seat on the council at the end of this year. She will work on the city’s affordable housing effort, as well as “act as the city’s liaison with the Hoboken Housing Authority and initiate additional community engagement on affordable housing, among several other tasks.”

City Councilor Vanessa Falco will lead the Housing Division early next year. Photo provided by the City of Hoboken.

During the meeting, there was a heated debate about the new department and the future direction of Falco.

At the start of the meeting, Sheila Brennan, a former candidate for at-Large city council, said the division is a good idea in principle, but a bad idea given its genesis. She also called Falco “completely without credentials and ill-equipped to take on the role based on any history.”

As Brennan was saying this, Falco nodded and smirked on her webcam and took a sip from her mug. Cheryl Fallick, a tenant activist who ran with Brennan on a list in this year’s election, called her when she spoke.

” President of the council [Ruben Ramos], maybe you should berate a few of your coworkers over there for making faces and making fun of members of the public, ”Fallick said.

“It’s my face, Cheryl, and I can do what I want with it,” Falco replied. “I got it with the name calling, the accusing references …”

The reunion quickly dissolved into a mishmash of voices between Falco, Fallick, and Ramos before being brought to order.

“I can’t control people’s faces,” Ramos said after the commotion.

“You can ask your fellow councilors to behave like adults,” Fallick replied.

Fallick then criticized the Housing Division for being “broadly, but ill-defined” in the municipal code, the vagueness of the job description and the responsibilities of determining what is up to date and enforcing control orders. rents.

Later, during the debate over passing the ordinance, Emily Jabbour defended Falco, saying people took the ordinance about Falco and made “nasty comments” about him as well.

“You can keep it professional, keep it clean, and focus on the politics of whether or not we need to establish this divide and not on who is involved,” Jabbour said.

Tiffanie Fisher responded that she didn’t disagree that they should always have decorum, but said there has been a lot of talk about the department and who will run it.

“It’s a controversial issue, and the only way to get the best possible outcome for the city is to have public engagement on an issue,” Fisher said.

The board ultimately voted 6-2-1 in favor of creating the department, with Fisher and Giattino voting no and Falco abstaining.

“The housing division and its functions is one that Mayor Bhalla and his administration consider important,” Falco said in an email. “I am very grateful for the collaborative relationship that I have been able to maintain with the Mayor and his staff and I look forward to continuing the work I started as General Councilor. “

For updates on this and more, check out www.hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Mark Koosau can be reached at mkoosau@hudsonreporter.com or his Twitter @snivyTsutarja.


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